Monday, May 25, 2020

Major General Benjamin Grierson in the Civil War

Major General Benjamin Grierson was noted Union cavalry commander during the Civil War. Serving in the Western Theater of the conflict, he came to fame while assigned to Major General Ulysses S. Grants Army of the Tennessee. During the campaign to capture Vicksburg, MS in 1863, Grierson led a famed cavalry raid through the heart of Mississippi which did substantial damage and distracted the Confederate strongholds garrison. In the final years of the conflict, he commanded cavalry formations in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Grierson spent the latter part of his career on the frontier until retiring from the US Army in 1890. Early Life Career Born July 8, 1826 in Pittsburgh, PA, Benjamin Grierson was the youngest child of Robert and Mary Grierson. Moving to Youngstown, OH at a young age, Grierson was educated locally. At the age of eight, he was badly injured when he was kicked by a horse. This incident scarred the young boy and left him afraid of riding. A gifted musician, Grierson began leading a local band at age thirteen and later pursued a career as a music teacher. Traveling west, he found employment as a teacher and band leader in Jacksonville, IL during the early 1850s. Making a home for himself, he married Alice Kirk on September 24, 1854. The following year, Grierson became a partner in a mercantile business in nearby Meredosia and later became involved in Republican politics. Major General Benjamin Grierson Rank: Major GeneralService: US ArmyBorn: July 8, 1826 at Pittsburgh, PADied: August 31, 1911 at Omena, MIParents: Robert and Mary GriersonSpouse: Alice Kirk, Lillian Atwood KingConflicts: Civil WarKnown For: Vicksburg Campaign (1862-1863) The Civil War Begins By 1861, Griersons business was failing as the nation descended into the Civil War. With the outbreak of hostilities, he joined the Union Army as an aide to Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss. Promoted to major on October 24, 1861, Grierson overcame his fear of horses and joined the 6th Illinois Cavalry. Serving with the regiment through the winter and into 1862, he was promoted to colonel on April 13. Part of the Union advance into Tennessee, Grierson led his regiment on numerous raids against Confederate railroads and military facilities while also scouting for the army. Displaying skill in the field, he was elevated to command a cavalry brigade in Major General Ulysses S. Grants Army of the Tennessee in November. Moving into Mississippi, Grant sought to capture the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg. Seizing the town was a vital step towards securing the Mississippi River for the Union and cutting the Confederacy in two. In November and December, Grant began advancing along the Mississippi Central Railroad toward Vicksburg. This effort was cut short when Confederate cavalry under Major General Earl Van Dorn attacked his main supply depot at Holly Springs, MS. As the Confederate cavalry withdrew, Griersons brigade was among the forces that mounted an unsuccessful pursuit. In the spring of 1863, Grant began planning a new campaign which would see his forces move down the river and cross below Vicksburg in conjunction with efforts by Rear Admiral David D. Porters gunboats. Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson (seated, center) with staff. Public Domain Griersons Raid To support this effort, Grant ordered Grierson to take a force of 1,700 men and raid through central Mississippi. The goal of the raid was to tie down enemy forces while also hampering the Confederates ability to reinforce Vicksburg by destroying railroads and bridges. Departing La Grange, TN on April 17, Griersons command included the 6th and 7th Illinois as wells as 2nd Iowa Cavalry regiments. Crossing the Tallahatchie River the next day, the Union troops enduring heavy rains but met little resistance. Eager to maintain a fast pace, Grierson sent 175 of his slowest, least effective men back to La Grange on April 20. Learning of the Union raiders, the commander at Vicksburg, Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton, ordered local cavalry forces to intercept them and directed part of his command to guard the railroads. Over the next several days, Grierson used a variety of ruses to throw off his pursuers as his men began disrupting the railroads of central Mississippi. Attacking Confederate installations and burning bridges and rolling stock, Griersons men created havoc and kept the enemy off balance. Repeatedly skirmishing with the enemy, Grierson led his men south towards Baton Rouge, LA. Arriving on May 2, his raid had been a stunning success and saw his command only lose three killed, seven wounded, and nine missing. More importantly, Griersons efforts effectively distracted Pembertons attention while Grant moved down the west bank of the Mississippi. Crossing the river on April 29-30, he embarked on a campaign that led to Vicksburgs capture on July 4. Later War After recovering from the raid, Grierson was promoted to brigadier general and ordered to join Major General Nathaniel Banks XIX Corps at the Siege of Port Hudson. Given command of the corps cavalry, he repeatedly skirmished with Confederate forces led by Colonel John Logan. The city finally fell to Banks on July 9. Returning to action the following spring, Grierson led a cavalry division during Major General William T. Shermans abortive Meridian Campaign. That June, his division was part of Brigadier General Samuel Sturgis command when it was routed by Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest at the Battle of Brices Crossroads. Following the defeat, Grierson was directed to take command of Union cavalry in the District of West Tennessee. Major General William T. Sherman. National Archives Records Administration In this role, he took part in the Battle of Tupelo with Major General Andrew J. Smiths XVI Corps. Engaging Forrest on July 14-15, Union troops inflicted a defeat on the daring Confederate commander. On December 21, Grierson led a raiding force of two cavalry brigades out against the Mobile Ohio Railroad. Attacking a dismounted part of Forrests command at Verona, MS on December 25, he succeeded in taking a large number of prisoners. Three days later, Grierson captured another 500 men when he attacked a train near Egypt Station, MS. Returning on January 5, 1865, Grierson received a brevet promotion to major general. Later that spring, Grierson joined Major General Edward Canby for the campaign against Mobile, AL which fell on April 12. Later Career With the end of the Civil War, Grierson elected to remain in the US Army. Though penalized for not being a West Point graduate, he was accepted into the regular service with the rank of colonel in recognition for his wartime achievements. In 1866, Grierson organized the new 10th Cavalry Regiment. Composed of African-American soldiers with white officers, the 10th was one of the original Buffalo Soldier regiments. A firm believer in his mens fighting ability, Grierson was ostracized by many other officers who doubted the African Americans skills as soldiers. After commanding Forts Riley and Gibson between 1867 and 1869, he selected the site for Fort Sill. Overseeing the new posts construction, Grierson led the garrison from 1869 to 1872. During his tenure at Fort Sill, Griersons support of the peace policy on the Kiowa-Comanche Reservation angered many settlers on the frontier. Over the next several years, he oversaw various posts along the western frontier and repeatedly skirmished with raiding Native Americans. During the 1880s, Grierson commanded the Departments of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. As in the past, he was relatively sympathetic to the plight of Native Americans living on the reservations. On April 5, 1890, Grierson was promoted to brigadier general. Retiring that July, he split his time between Jacksonville, IL and a ranch near Fort Concho, TX. Suffering a severe stroke in 1907, Grierson clung to life until finally dying at Omena, MI on August 31, 1911. His remains were later buried in Jacksonville.

Friday, May 15, 2020

The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake Essay - 596 Words

In the Chimney Sweeper, William Blake portrays the lack of innocence in these young boys lives since they are expected to have attained the experience to preform such unjust actions. The speaker of the poem begins it by letting us know that after his mother passed away his father gave him up to be a chimneysweeper so he could obtain money. These two figures, his mother and father are whom kids are supposed to depend on and look up for guidance. He feels abandoned because his mother is gone and his father gave him up for money, this show just how poor his family was and how his father would do anything for a chance at a better living, whether it included his son or not. The speaker also says that he became a sweeper when he had hardly†¦show more content†¦The dream continues on by say that an â€Å"angel† came by and set them free, which means that all of the chimneysweepers were free from work and they did not have to put up with the terrible conditions of the job a nymore. The other part of Toms dream included that boys going to â€Å"wash in the river and shine in the sun† meaning they could free them from the soot and actually see their clean skin not covered in black. This gave Tom a sense of what freedom would actually feel like and what life could be when he is done working as a chimneysweeper. Them being naked and white represent the cleanliness from the soot and symbolize their youth and purity so they can act now act and preform just how kids should. Also in line seventeen it mentions their bags being left behind, their â€Å"bags† represent their memories of chimney sweeping and how after they are free they are supposed to leave the bad memories in the past. Next it gradually mentions that â€Å"they rise upon clouds and sport in the wind† this symbolizes their second chance at life now that they are free to make their own decisions, it is as if they are given a second chance to be who they want to. After this Tom s dream continues with the angel telling Tom that â€Å"if he’d be a good boy, He’d have God for his father never want joy† this is dramatic irony because Tom never got the chance to prove that he was a good boyShow MoreRelatedThe Chimney Sweeper By William Blake1487 Words   |  6 Pageschoice but to sell their sons and daughters. Unfortunately, the career that children were forced into was chimney sweeping, which had a terrifyingly high mortality rate. The poem, â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper†, written by William Blake, tells the heartbreaking story of a child who is sold into chimney sweeping at a young age and leads a devastating life. After reading Blake’s poem about the sweepers, one may begin to wonder how it was possible for children to be treated so poorly, and how the king of thatRead MoreThe Chimney Sweeper By William Blake1306 Words   |  6 PagesWilliam Blake published â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† in 1789 in the first phase of his collection of poems entitled â€Å"Songs of Innocence†. A later poem under the same name was published five years later in his follow up collection, â€Å"Songs of Experience†. The chimney sweeper’s tale begins in Songs of Innocence with the introduction of a young boy who was sold by his father after the death of his mother; the poem then shifts in the next stanza to describe the speaker’s friend Tom Dacre, another chimney sweeperRead MoreThe Chimney Sweepers By William Blake862 Words   |  4 Pages The Chimney Sweepers William Blake has written two poems with the same title of Chimney Sweeper, however each poem was written to portray a different perspective of similar situations. The poem Chimney Sweep (Songs of Experience) is written in a bleaker scope compared to Chimney Sweep (Songs of Innocence) which happens to be much more optimistic.Willaim Blake had written these stories as foils of one another and which has helped readers compare and contrast the messages that the poems are tryingRead MoreThe Chimney Sweeper by William Blake1202 Words   |  5 PagesWilliam Blake, author of Songs of Experience, wrote various poems, which are accompanied by their contradicting Songs of Innocence poems. Through the contradiction of both poems, Blake emphasizes the need for both innocence and experience in order to live a good life. In â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper†, Blake shows the life of a young orphan boy. In the songs of innocence poem, the boy is naive and is unaware of the injustice around him; how ever, the songs of experience poem contradict that life style andRead MoreChimney Sweeper William Blake2301 Words   |  10 PagesWilliam Blake proved himself as one of the most influential artists to spring from the Romantic Era without a doubt. What made Blake so popular may have been his ability to portray his time period in works of art that were beautifully crafted. Blake’s poetry was not appreciated during his lifetime because people were living the lives his works vicariously told, but once his time period ended, a historical book was left behind. The theme of a struggle is most prominently showcased in Blake’s poetryRead MoreThe Chimney Sweeper By William Blake1887 Words   |  8 PagesWilliam Blake, author of The Chimney Sweeper, gives the reader an uncomfortable feeling of the acceptance, and cruelty of child labor. With the use of anecdote, biblical allusions and a very sympathetic and retributive tone—Blake is able to transform the surreal idea of child labor into a visual reality. The poem revolves around a little boy, who the narrator describes as a â€Å"little black thing†, who is working as a sweeper in very poor and hopeless conditions. Through the voice of the child chimneyRead MoreThe Chimney Sweeper by William Blake515 Words   |  2 PagesWilliam Blake’s poem, â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† is a poem about children losing their innocence and being forced to clean chimneys. The setting is in the industrial period when children in orphanages being sent to work at such a young age. The young boys were usually the ones to be put to work because they were small enough to get into the chimneys and clean them. Children in this era eventually were diagnosed with Black Lung Disease because they inhaled too much soot in their lungs. The poem opensRead MoreSocial Criticism in William Blakes Chimney Sweeper3015 Words   |  13 PagesSocial Criticism in William Blake’s â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† ‘The Chimney Sweeper’ by William Blake criticises child labour and especially society that sees the children’s misery but chooses to look away and it reveals the change of the mental state of those children who were forced to do such cruel work at the age of four to nine years. It shows the change from an innocent child that dreams of its rescue to the child that has accepted its fate. Those lives seem to oppose each other and yet if one readsRead MoreWilliam Blake s Inscription On The Young Chimney Sweepers1382 Words   |  6 PagesWilliam Blake s Inscription on the Young Chimney Sweepers By: Kyle Fitch Prof. Joseph McNally Engl. 3312 B April 20, 2015 A key point in the history of mankind was the Industrial Revolution. It was also a difficult time in history in terms of suffering, especially for the lower class that had to work twice as hard as the upper class for minimum wage. A young poet by the name of William Blake became livid and motivated in the late eighteenth century by the coldhearted usage of young boysRead MoreThe Chimney Sweeper and London by William Blake and Tich Miller and Timothy Winters2299 Words   |  10 PagesThe two poems â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† and â€Å"London† by William Blake, and the two poems â€Å"Tich Miller† and â€Å"Timothy Winters† are all on a theme of childhood, however, they are set in different eras and so childhood should be very different. Discuss this, comparing and contrasting the poems. As a child, William Blake was a loner. He never socialised with other children and sat by himself reading the Bible. His family were very religious, but did not agree with organised religion. This meant

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Geography Of Bliss By Eric Weiner - 1379 Words

There are different factors that affect happiness and it is rooted from the country you were born in. â€Å"We are shaped not only by our current geography, but by our ancestral one as well (Weiner 112). Most countries have different culture that contributes to people s happiness. People who live in America will not be as happy as the one who lived in Moldova. In Eric Weiner s, book The Geography of Bliss. He was searching for data on happiness. He conducts a study on how people in different countries understand and measure their happiness. The biggest factors that affect people s happiness are the environment and cultural differences. Where you live is a big factor of who you are. People find happiness when they feel comfortable and†¦show more content†¦It’s unsettling. The playground! It used to be right here, I swear. Mess with our hometown, and you’re messing with our past, with who we are. Nobody likes that. (108) This relates to his visit in Qatar where he observed that there are several things that are not common to him. Like there are no 7-11 stores in Qatar because Qataris have helpers that can do groceries for them. He compares his hotel to a climate-controlled tomb even though it is a nice hotel that can provide everything he needs, he is not happy. Last is the solid heat that he felt during his stay. Indeed staying or living in a new environment where not everything is normal in their perspective would be difficult and unsettling to people who is new or not familiar with the environment. I have experienced living in a foreign country where I need to work for one year. At first, I find Taiwan exciting. Meeting new friends and exploring new places is fun. Until, I realized that I missed home where I have my own room where I can sleep comfortably without sharing rooms with other people whom I didn t know personally. In addition, I find it difficult to commute, purchase, and communicate because I don t aware which bus I m takin g. I don t know how to read Taiwan s character which is the posted all over the place and I don t speak their language. Moreover, I lose weight during my stay because I cannot eat the food provided by our company and

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Edward Thomas - analysis of quote And yet I am half in love with pain free essay sample

Thomas expresses the view that he is ‘half in love with pain’ in various poems, particularly ‘Melancholy’ and ‘Rain’. In both of these poems he seems to resent his troubles but also appreciates them in a rather unusual way. He expresses this by juxtaposing his inner states of joy and melancholy and the outer states of weather and the natural world. Throughout ‘Melancholy’, we see a relationship between pain and pleasure as he presents them as two halves of a whole experience, where one is consistently reinforming the other, as an endless cycle and revolution, like the seasons. When looking at ‘Melancholy’, it is clear that Thomas is suffering and in sadness; it is a state of mind for him. This may also be due to his mother suffering from depression, that he too lived with. Although Thomas resents his illness in this poem, he does not want to change his ways, ‘so that if I feared the solitude / far more I feared all company: too sharp, too rude. ’ His disliking of being alone does not motivate him to find any company as he has found faults in this too. Instead, Thomas remains in this state, which shows the audience that maybe he does not want to escape this gloomy mind set; which then shows us that maybe a part of him takes pleasure in his own sadness. This strange behaviour is expressed more clearly throughout the poem, where he uses a metaphor of weather for his illness, (as we have seen in various other poems from Thomas, such as ‘March’), ‘The rain and wind, the rain and wind, raved endlessly.’ Considering dreary and terrible weather usually reflects Thomas’ own feelings, Thomas’ use of repetition accentuates the never ending pain he endures, as does the more to the point, ‘raved endlessly’. However, Thomas then goes on to say ‘On me the summer storm, and fever, and melancholy / Wrought magic’ Even from ‘summer storm’ we can infer that he has a bittersweet view of his own pain – Summer usually being something Thomas takes pleasure in (as in many poems such as ‘March’ and ‘But These Things Also’, he talks of his happiness as the Winter ends and the more enjoyable weather begins) paired with a storm; and then proceeding to openly addressing his own sadness as a ‘fever’ shows the direct link between the weather and his own emotions. Thomas’ enjoyment becomes clear when he states that this ‘fever and melancholy’ has ‘wrought magic’. Thomas has found something special and moving, although it is often seen as awful and displeasing. He seems to be trying to say that his own illness has cast a spell on him, which is interesting as he addresses it positively with  Ã¢â‚¬Ëœmagic’. This point is proven further when Thomas goes on to say ‘Yet naught did my despair / But sweeten the strange sweetness’; the fact that Thomas repeats the word ‘sweet’ twice exaggerates the extent to which he takes a curious joy in his own pain. In ‘Rain’ there is a link between rain and his own sadness, as Thomas frequently uses rain as a symbol of his own pain being present. However, this poem is somewhat confusing as he describes rain as a dissolver of pain, ‘And neither hear the rain nor give it thanks / for washing me cleaner than I have been’. In this extract Thomas shows the rain to be almost washing away his sins. The rain, in this poem, holds some religious connotations, as Thomas also states ‘Blessed are the dead that the rain rains upon’. Although the rain is seemingly a symbol of cleanliness and purity, it is also a constant reminder of his own solitude and fear of death, ‘nothing but the wild rain / On this bleak hut, and solitude, and me / Remembering again that I shall die’. Here the rain is constant, wild, never ending; the sound of the rain seems to be a reminder of his loneliness in the world. The rain is almost presented as both holy and as an evil reminder, perhaps as half pleasure and half pain. Thomas then goes on to say, ‘But here I pray that none whom once I loved / Is dying tonight or lying still awake / Solitary, listening to the rain’. Here we see that to Thomas, the sound of the rain is a sign of solitude and/or death; but this could perhaps be argued against, as death is the end to all pain. As we have seen earlier on in the poem, Thomas has resented death as it takes away his ability to enjoy the beauty of nature, ‘Remembering again that I shall die / And neither hear the rain nor give it thanks’. Thomas’ famous love for nature is taken away by death, and this is obviously a source of pain for him. However, towards the end of the poem, he states ‘If love it be towards what is perfect and / Cannot, the tempest tells me, disappoint.’ Thomas finds that death is in a way, perfect, as it will dissolve his pain, and can not ‘disappoint’. It is clear that Thomas is conflicted with whether he wants to die, as he finds pleasure in the pain of this, too. In conclusion, Thomas expresses that he is ‘half in love with pain’ through the juxtaposition of his inner views and comparing these with the states of weather: Thomas shows that pain often changes a human being in such a way that they become ‘magic’ and otherworldly, and this change of perspective makes him see the world in a different way, and this, is what Thomas takes pleasure in.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Free Essays on The Idealistic Shepherd Vs. The Realistic Nymph

An Idealistic Shepherd vs. a Realistic Nymph As human beings we deal with life essentially two ways, either realistically or idealistically. Human tendency is to see things the way we want to see them, the way that is most appealing to us. Yet society teaches us to take a step back from what we see and look at it from a more objective place. Christopher Marlowe and Sir Walter Raleigh have captured these two phenomenon through the writings of their contrasting poems â€Å"The Passionate Shepherd to His Love† by Marlowe and â€Å"The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd† by Raleigh. For the half of the world that is guided by their dreams and fantasies, the idealistic view of the Shepherd in Marlowe’s poem is a perfect illustration. The more realistic answer from the Nymph in Raleigh’s work satisfactorily characterizes the other half of the population that is more grounded and levelheaded. Though the structure of the two poems is virtually identical, they both illustrate that all humans regardless o f age, race, or creed fall into one of these two categories. The work by Marlowe is a prime example of the idealistic point of view that one’s mind or body is what constitutes reality. The views of love and nature seen in the poem fit perfectly into this category. The subject of this poem is a young shepherd who is courting a young lady. He is trying to persuade her to be his love and come live with him in eternal bliss through many promises both tangible and otherwise. Through his many promises of beds of roses, hats of flowers, and slippers with gold buckles he repeatedly tries to convince her that living with him will, as he says, â€Å"all the pleasures prove† (2). In the 3rd stanza the shepherd’s focus shifts from the pleasures nature can offer to what he is willing to provide her with. This is exemplified in lines 21 and 22 as he gives his word that â€Å" The shepherds’ swain shall dance and sing,/ for thy delight each May mornin... Free Essays on The Idealistic Shepherd Vs. The Realistic Nymph Free Essays on The Idealistic Shepherd Vs. The Realistic Nymph An Idealistic Shepherd vs. a Realistic Nymph As human beings we deal with life essentially two ways, either realistically or idealistically. Human tendency is to see things the way we want to see them, the way that is most appealing to us. Yet society teaches us to take a step back from what we see and look at it from a more objective place. Christopher Marlowe and Sir Walter Raleigh have captured these two phenomenon through the writings of their contrasting poems â€Å"The Passionate Shepherd to His Love† by Marlowe and â€Å"The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd† by Raleigh. For the half of the world that is guided by their dreams and fantasies, the idealistic view of the Shepherd in Marlowe’s poem is a perfect illustration. The more realistic answer from the Nymph in Raleigh’s work satisfactorily characterizes the other half of the population that is more grounded and levelheaded. Though the structure of the two poems is virtually identical, they both illustrate that all humans regardless o f age, race, or creed fall into one of these two categories. The work by Marlowe is a prime example of the idealistic point of view that one’s mind or body is what constitutes reality. The views of love and nature seen in the poem fit perfectly into this category. The subject of this poem is a young shepherd who is courting a young lady. He is trying to persuade her to be his love and come live with him in eternal bliss through many promises both tangible and otherwise. Through his many promises of beds of roses, hats of flowers, and slippers with gold buckles he repeatedly tries to convince her that living with him will, as he says, â€Å"all the pleasures prove† (2). In the 3rd stanza the shepherd’s focus shifts from the pleasures nature can offer to what he is willing to provide her with. This is exemplified in lines 21 and 22 as he gives his word that â€Å" The shepherds’ swain shall dance and sing,/ for thy delight each May mornin...

Sunday, February 23, 2020

Rapid Freight Communications Refresh Case Study

Rapid Freight Communications Refresh - Case Study Example In fact, the vision of the company is to ensure stipulation of the best customer service to maintain customer satisfaction and improve company value. This paper will identify several requirements in Rapid Freight and provide an analysis of the requirements. This essay will also provide a proposal regarding a converged network solution which solves the identified requirements from a cost-benefit perspective. As stated above, Rapid Freight hopes to excel in providing logistics services and efficient transport facilities to the clients. However, there are several challenges that are closely related to the business structure. This asserts that Rapid Freight has several requirements as a freight forwarder. According to the case study, it is quite evident that Rapid Freight requires an improved transport system. Rapid Freight operates in a highly competitive environment, therefore; the company requires an improved transport system to cope with the growing number of clients. An improved tra nsport system will ensure that Rapid Freight has an on-time delivery schedule. The improved transport system can also involve video conferencing in order to reduce travel-related issues (White, 2011). Rapid Freight also needs to upgrade its telephone system. Currently, Rapid Freight uses the ISDN telephone system that is quite outdated. Research asserts that the company has been avoiding upgrades due to the high cost involved. The ISDN telephone system has significantly hindered Rapid Freight from optimal performance (White, 2011). In addition, the ISDN service provider has turned out to be extremely costly to Rapid Freight International. This affirms that the company should invest in an upgraded telephone system that will significantly lower costs and ensure maximum consumer protection. Rapid Freight should also improve their communication system to ensure customer satisfaction. A robust communication system allows clients to communicate effectively with the representatives of the company in regard to freight services. According to the case study, the voice mail system belonging to Rapid Freight is overloaded due to the high influx of messages sent by clients (White, 2011). Although the mobile workforce of the company has also grown rapidly, the company can enhance the mode of technology used by the drivers. Introducing new technology among the drivers will ensure that the drivers are able to scan consignments and later sync them through a GPRS link to the headquarters of the company, whereby the consignments are usually tracked. In addition, Rapid Freight can also upgrade their web-based systems which are used by clients to execute various tasks. Some of the tasks include generating reports and creating freight communication. This upgrade will ensure that Rapid Freight can curb the growing number of clients in its wide area network (WAN) (White, 2011). Various sources claim that Rapid Freight has a vision of increasing their bandwidth in most of the offices, especially those located in the United States. Through this, the company will avail a reliable and secure network. Hence, this will ensure that network outages and unscheduled downtime are avoided entirely. The web-based technologies will also assist the company substantially when tracking freight, communicating with the customer, ensuring on-time deliveries and differentiating the services offered by the company. Rapid Freight can